Tag Archives: home visits

Sharing the Job That Empowers Us: Educating Our Students!

By Sara Arranz May 30th, 2014 10:00 AM

A good beginning is important for a strong ending. Every year, I make sure to start the school year by meeting each one of my students’ families. This introductory dialogue is the key to a successful year, and I really appreciate the information they share with me during that very first meeting.

You might be asking, “why is this contact important, and what should we talk about?” When you are talking with parents, let them know how much you care about their kids and how successful you want them to be. Offer your help and support unconditionally. But, do not forget to let them know their duties. In my experience, I must say that having a fluent and healthy relationship with my families at Cleveland has helped my students grow and achieve better results.

I’d like to share a few tips from my classroom that make me a more powerful educator and empower my families every day:

  1. Share your contact information with your families and provide them with your schedule and flexibility at the beginning of the year.
  2. Talk with your families about using the Internet and media to be able to receive and send messages.
  3. Share your expectations for the year with every family: classroom management, schedule, materials, homework, etc., and assure them that they can ask for help at any time.
  4. Make all those expectations visible in the room. Designate a board for their information. 
    Familias Picture_SA
  5. Display student work so that your families can see what their child is working on in class.Student Work_2_SAStudent Work_SA
  6. Ask them to sign a contract to “work by your side”. They must agree to the procedures that will help students to progress. This includes things like punctuality, homework, attendance, help at home, etc.
  7. Explain the curriculum and methodology that you use in your class (Creative Curriculum, Tools of the Mind, and Reggio are a few examples for early childhood) and discuss how that methodology transfers to their daily life and home.
  8. Send homework weekly; it does not need to be anything intense but it has to be something that families can relate to and help with. Offer your help with materials, resources, and ideas.
  9. Write a newsletter. it is important for families to stay informed about the activities that are happening every month. Always add your contact information as a reminder.Newsletter_SA
  10. Find a time to call, email or text to share good news with them.
  11. Send families pictures or videos of their children working, exploring, investigating and sharing.
  12. Invite your families to class for interviews. Allow them to share their expertise, read with students, or help out with a field trip or lesson. Students love to see their parents involved, and it reinforces the idea that “my parents care about me.”
  13. If a conflict arises, find a moment as soon as possible to converse with that family and resolve it. Remember and remind them that you are both “in the same boat” rowing to the same island – educating our students.
  14. Celebrate the joy of sharing a wonderful job. You are both educating their children, and it’s important to find a moment to smile and enjoy it with them.Families_SA

Finally, I would like to share part of my plan for next year. As part of my classroom “Innovation Plan,” I will be dedicating time during the initial weeks of the school year for a “School for Parents Workshop.” In these meetings, I will share information about expectations and procedures, discuss with them how to ask for help and where to find resources, and exchange best practices and new ideas.

In addition, I am so excited that next year we are going to start a home visits program where we will visit families in their own environment and context, making communication even easier and more accessible. Using these new strategies, I hope to build even stronger relationships with my families next year!

Advertisements

The ABC’s of Improving Home-School Partnerships

By Angelique Kwabenah May 27th, 2014 3:00 PM

Students do better in school and in life when their families are engaged. A strong body of evidence clearly points to the fact that, from birth through adolescence, family engagement contributes to a range of positive student outcomes. Parent engagement looks different depending on the school, but one of the ways that parent engagement is addressed in alternative school settings is through home visits. Home visits can be a valuable way to engage parents in their child’s education, but they sometimes present challenges as well. Keeping in mind this simple “ABC Framework” will help schools to engage parents more effectively and move students to greater levels of academic proficiency.

Accommodate: Being accommodating to parents schedules and needs is critical to fostering a cohesive partnership. When scheduling a home visit, it is advisable to give parents options in terms of a meeting location. For example, our school meets with parents at the Anacostia Library instead of meeting them in the home if that is more convenient or closer to their workplace. Accept that parents may have valid reasons for wanting to meet in an alternate location and be open to that, not oppositional.

Break down: It is also critical to break down any barriers that might prevent a positive meeting experience. Parents may have perceptions about us as teachers and we may have our own personal views about the parents, as well, that could negatively impact a meeting if they are not openly and transparently discussed. Get any pre-conceived notions out in the open and clear the air so that the parameters have been set for both sides to have a positive and productive meeting. Building bridges that can be crossed by everyone will help to establish a more amicable environment in which parents and teachers feel valued and respected.

Collaborate: Collaborating with parents encourages cultural awareness and respect and has been an important aspect of the success of our home visits. Our parents are appreciative of the fact that that they are included in the decision making process, particularly when it relates to developing transition plans for our students that will help to ensure their continued success when they return to the community. Overwhelmingly, the consensus is that parents want their voices heard and that they feel more engaged when we make them an integral part of the planning process and don’t just impose an idea.

Although many challenges may arise when attempting to conduct home visits in an alternative school setting, benefits like increased student achievement, a decrease in student behavior infractions, and a more cohesive home-school partnership make the efforts well worth it in the long run. Students do better in school and in life when their families and schools are working together in work that truly matters.